Visiting Intel with SFD 12

Howard Marks was at Storage Field Day and got to see the latest and greatest from Intel. As the current de facto CPU and chipset vendor in the data center, Howard sees them as having an immense responsibility in terms of dictating computer architecture. Luckily from what Howard saw at Intel’s presentation, they are living up to this. As an example, he goes into the applications and implication of their Storage Performance Developer Kit, as well as their recent release of the first commercial 3D XPoint.


Storage Field Day 12 – Day 3 Recap | The Partly Cloudy Blog

Adam Bergh went to first Storage Field Day this month. He wrote up a post outlining the presentations he saw at the last day of the event. SNIA and Intel gave Adam a lot of food for thought. SNIA gave an overview of its role in the industry, as well as reviewing the development of hyperscaler storage. Intel reviewed developments with its Storage Performance Development Kit and Resource Director Technology.


Intel Optane Enters the Market – Gestalt IT

Rich Stroffolino gives his thoughts on Intel’s release of their first commercial 3D XPoint product, the Optane P4800X. He situates where its initial $1500+ price tag puts it within the world of new storage technology, what the new tech should be good for in the data center, and similarities to existing storage-as-memory products.


Intel SPDK and NVMe-oF will accelerate NVMe adoption rates

Intel’s presentation from Storage Field Day this month certainly made an impression on the delegates. Jon Klaus wrote up his thoughts. He goes into particular details over SPDK and NVMe over Fabrics, both of which he thinks will have genuine business impacts for overall NVMe adoption. For Jon, this is an example of Intel pushing software to truly catch up to recent advances in hardware.


Intel Are Putting Technology To Good Use

Intel’s Storage Performance Development Kit made quite an impression on the Storage Field Day delegates. Dan Frith is no exception. He’s written up his thoughts on how it impact the emerging NVMe storage space. SPDK is able to offer much lower latency and better scaling IOPS than the standard Linux kernel, mainly by replacing its kernel-based interrupt-driven driver. This centers storage CPU needs on dedicated cores, and frees up overall system resources. In use cases, early customers have seen a roughly 300% improvement in latency and IOPS. The presentation left Dan “mighty excited”!


Intel Storage Futures From #SFD12

Chan Ekanayake shares his thoughts from Intel’s presentation at Storage Field Day earlier in March. He focuses in on Intel’s Storage Performance Development Kit, and how SPDK will impact enterprise storage. It’s an open sources replacement for a lot of the storage functions of the Linux kernel, which allows for much lower latency, and nearly linear scaling of NVMe drive performance.


In Search of the Perfect Data Management Machine

Glenn Dekhayser has a write up from his first Storage Field Day event. He got to hear from Intel, specifically about their Storage Performance Development Kit. Intel developed this to give hyperscale deployments more consistent performance for storage latency, which in SSDs often experiences frustrating tail latency. SPDK works by isolating an entire CPU core solely to storage IO. This allows for much lower latency, and gives you almost linear scalability with NVMe drives. Glenn is impressed with the impacts this could have at scale.


Hardware has set the pace for latency, time for software to catch up

Jon Klaus thinks software needs to catch up to SSDs for reducing application latency. Initially, SSDs were limited by storage processors and buses build with spinning disks in mind. This has largely been remedied, so where’s the next big performance bottleneck? Latency.

Jon looks at how Intel’s Storage Performance Development Kit, presented at Storage Field Day in October, effects latency by replacing the traditional Linux kernel in storage controllers.


Intel SPDK – A foundation block for new generation storage

Max Mortillaro tackles the topic of storage latency in his latest post. Inspired by the Intel Storage presentation at Storage Field Day, he discusses the history of storage latency and presents the need for faster software. He then discusses Intel’s Storage Performance Development Kit (SPDK), which might allow software latency to approach the performance of modern solid-state storage.


Open-Source Hardware Designs – One step beyond commodity?

Open-Source Hardware Designs – One step beyond commodity?


What should we expect from the next generation storage?

What should we expect from the next generation storage?


10 on Tech Episode 013: J Metz on NVMe and NVMe-oF

10 on Tech Episode 013: J Metz on NVMe and NVMe-oF


Storage Field Day 11 Previews: Intel, HGST

Storage Field Day 11 Previews: Intel, HGST


Data Corruption – The Silent Killer

Data Corruption – The Silent Killer


Memory-based storage? Yes, please!

Memory-based storage? Yes, please!


Intel, Storage, Bitrot, and Cosmic Rays

Intel, Storage, Bitrot, and Cosmic Rays


With FLASH, things are changing ‘in a flash’ !?

With FLASH, things are changing ‘in a flash’ !?


Are you going All-Flash? Nah, the future is hybrid

Are you going All-Flash? Nah, the future is hybrid


Talking NVMe, 3DXpoint and Networking

Talking NVMe, 3DXpoint and Networking


Understanding NVMe (Non-Volatile Memory Express)

Understanding NVMe (Non-Volatile Memory Express)