OpenFlow – Basic Concepts and Theory

In this post, David Varnum goes over some of the fundamental concepts of OpenFlow. He goes as far back as to distinguish the control plane from the data plane. David then goes into great detail about OpenFlow’s design and features. What inspired this deep dive into OpenFlow? At Networking Field Day in November, David saw a presentation from NEC on their ProgrammableFlow controller, a SDN product that uses the OpenFlow protocol. David found it “wildly impressive”, and wanted to get a better understanding of the protocol.


See in the Fog with Ixia CloudLens

David Varnum draws a great analogy. In a lot of ways, flying through cloud and managing cloud infrastructure and applications are similar. Both don’t seem to bad to navigate from the outside, but once inside, you lose perspective. This requires both a pilot and systems engineer to have precise instrumentation to properly navigate where they want to go. With Ixia’s CloudLens, David sees someone finally providing that instrumentation.


Apstra intends greatness beyond Sparta

Apstra has a really interesting pitch. What if instead of building your network around how each vendor’s node and appliance talked to one another and what capabilities it had, you could design the network the way you wanted it to work first, and use an abstraction layer to make sure all the individual pieces played nice with one another? That’s what Apstra is proposing with their Apstra Operating System (AOS). David Varnum gave it a look at Tech Field Day, and shares his enthusiasm for their intent-driven approach.


Forward Networks – Extraordinary Stuff!

Before November’s Networking Field Day, I was trying to find out anything I could about Forward Networks. They were in stealth until the week of the event, but I still thought I could find a few leaks or details about what they were up to, other than that they were a networking startup. Sadly, my Google-fu failed me, leaving me a blank slate for their presentation. As a delegate at the event, David Varnum was in much the same boat. To say he came away excited is an understatement. What Forward Networks does is make a complete and constantly updating model of your network. They do this by mathematically predicting every single location a packet can travel within a given network configuration. David goes into full details about why this is amazing, but the Forward Networks elevator pitch is pretty good: They’re doing for network mapping what Google did to web indexes.


My thoughts on Paessler may surprise you

My thoughts on Paessler may surprise you


How writing has turned walls into windows

How writing has turned walls into windows


Fireflies, Synchronicity and SD-WAN

Fireflies, Synchronicity and SD-WAN


ONUG – What is it, and why am I here?

ONUG – What is it, and why am I here?


802.11ac Wave 2 MGig and Ciscos 2800 & 3800 Series Access Points

802.11ac Wave 2, MGig and Cisco’s 2800 & 3800 Series Access Points


The roof, the roof, the roof is on IP

The roof, the roof, the roof is on IP


Cisco Linguistics & The Grumpy Old Router

Cisco Linguistics & The Grumpy Old Router


OpenStack Neutron Lovebomb at NFD10

OpenStack Neutron Lovebomb at NFD10


What you need to know about Riverbed’s SD-WAN

What you need to know about Riverbed’s SD-WAN


Big Switch Labs – A Playground for Big Minds

Big Switch Labs – A Playground for Big Minds


The Application-centric model of Cisco’s IWAN

The Application-centric model of Cisco’s IWAN


David Varnum

David Varnum is Network and Data Center engineer, architect, consultant and blogger. CCIE DC #45880. His focus is adapting business strategies with emerging enterprise developments in data center, security and virtualization realms. Prior to his current role, he served as lead engineer and consultant in both private and public sectors. David holds his CCIE in […]