The Year of Cloud Extension

The idea of incorporating cloud storage into the data center has been around for a while. But Stephen Foskett thinks we’re seeing philosophically different approaches to it recently, with many companies embracing the premise of data non-locality. Stephen sees this change in the assumption from data being tied to a data center to the cloud as a transformative shift allowing for true data center transformation.


There’s A Whole Lot More To StarWind Than Free Stuff

StarWind presented at Storage Field Day earlier this month in Silicon Valley. Dan Frith thought they made a compelling case for their storage appliance in the 20 – 40TB hybrid or all-flash space, where high performance is needed cost effectively. Though the HCI space is crowded, he thinks StarWind can differentiate on broad protocol support and practical management features.


StarWind Gives You a Gateway to the Cloud – Gestalt IT

Rich Stroffolino reviews what he saw from StarWind at Storage Field Day. He particularly looks at their “cloud gateway” hardware, that lets you have addressable cloud storage via a standard SATA interface. It’s an interesting bridge device that could be used to replace spinning disks for cold data.


Storage Field Day 12 Day 1 Recap and Day 2 Preview

Adam Bergh wrote up his thoughts after the first day of Storage Field Day, held last week in Silicon Valley. First up was Ryussi with their MoSMB solution. Adam found it an interesting SMB3 stack, ideally suited for scalable environments due to it’s lightweight and performance considerations. Starwind then presented, and Adam enjoyed hearing about their Cloud Gateway hardware, basically a hard drive without the drive to make cloud storage more addressable to your server. Elastifile presented about their distributed file system for block storage on Linux, using a very interesting consistency algorithm to keep performance from suffering. Finally, to finish the day, Excelero presented, launching their NVMesh solution. Adam was impressed when he saw 2.4 million IOPs at 0.2ms latency using relatively inexpensive hardware.